Bitcoin Core Daemon im Userspace häuslich einrichten und ...

Aeon

Aeon (AEON) is a private, secure, untraceable currency. You are your bank, you control your funds, and nobody can trace your transfers.
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Can i block BU agent/nodes from connecting to my bitcoin #core daemon?

Hello Guys,
Is it possible to block/prevent specific agent name (BU, or some wallets rather then old version of bitcoin) from connecting to my node?
block the IPs it's easy also from the interface but this is ofc not very effective.
thanks
submitted by smoothcoke to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can i block BU agent/nodes from connecting to my bitcoin #core daemon? /r/Bitcoin

Can i block BU agent/nodes from connecting to my bitcoin #core daemon? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin techie question: Block count in Bitcoin Core Daemon version v0.10.0

getblockcount on my node shows: 302729
Yet, Blockchain.io shows 353413
Am I pruning, or pointed at testnet or something?
Thanks in advance. BITCOIN RULEZ
submitted by fuckotheclown2 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Running the Bitcoin core daemon as a Docker container

Running the Bitcoin core daemon as a Docker container submitted by haakon to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

how to access local full node from other machine...

In an effort to learn about and support the neetwork, I have setup a full node running bitcoin core on a dedicated linux box. It's been running smoothly for about a month after the blockchain dl and I smile a little every time I login to check logs and diskspace and all the little sysadmin tasks.
I would like to run a wallet gui client on my daily box that accesses the bitcoin box in a client/server sort of way.
Can bitcoin core do this? If not, is there a wallet (windows) that will provide a full gui while using the bitcoin core daemon running on my linux box?
submitted by TopherBrowne to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Lightning at Home - How to set up a working Lightning Network node at home, consisting of Bitcoin Core (mainnet) and Lightning Network Daemon (LND)

Lightning at Home - How to set up a working Lightning Network node at home, consisting of Bitcoin Core (mainnet) and Lightning Network Daemon (LND) submitted by parakite to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How long needs a raspberry pi3+ to sync from 0 to full? I know because I did: Its 19 Days

So I got a Raspberry pi 3+ and a Samsung MU-PA500B SSD, installed a headless raspbian and bitcoin core and let it run on Dec 16 and today it finally finished syncing :)
My internet connection is a 100Mbit down / 20Mbit up cable line and this bitcoin.conf settings work best for me:
daemon=1
logips=1
maxconnections=40
maxuploadtarget=5000
txindex=1
rest=1
server=1
walletrbf=1
dbcache=100
I don't have swap and dbcache=100 lets the bitcoin core daemon use ~800MB of memory which works nice for the pi.
Lessons learned? Not really, running bitcoin core is easy as fuck, simply fire&forget, the fun part starts now when a personal electrum server and a lightning node will come on top, but however there indeed was a lesson I learnt: Don't use fancy shmancy file systems like btrfs on your ssd because creating of swap files is not supported and it took me hours to find out this simple fact^^
submitted by FieserKiller to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Lightning at Home - How to set up a working Lightning Network node at home, consisting of Bitcoin Core (mainnet) and Lightning Network Daemon (LND) (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

Lightning at Home - How to set up a working Lightning Network node at home, consisting of Bitcoin Core (mainnet) and Lightning Network Daemon (LND) (x-post from /Bitcoin) submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

[DEVELOPMENT] Bitcoind IPV4 testnet port (18332) is failing to bind

[SOLVED] Thanks for everyone that have helped!


Hello everyone, this is a development problem that I'm currently having. Since the BTC Development sub is kind of inactive and I couldn't find any rule contraty to posting about BTC Development, I'll try my luck in here as I'm hopeless already. I've posted on BTC Stack Exchange but no answers also. Please, don't get me wrong, I'm trying to solve this problem for many days now, I've looked up everywhere for this.
I'm new to Bitcoin development and I'm currently having difficulties trying to make RPC calls from a Docker Container to a Bitcoin-Core daemon running in a SSH server. I suppose that the problem may be with Firewall or closed ports, but I also do not know much about Network settings.
I'm using nbobtc/bitcoind-php package to make the RPC calls with HTTP requests, and it is running in a Docker container. I'm sure the container is functional and is not the problem.
So here's what happening: when I run bitcoind in root user (but normal also won't work) in my SSH server, the IPV4 testnet port seems to be not opened. This message goes up when I run bitcoind:
Binding RPC on address 0.0.0.0 port 18332 failed.
Here's what my bitcoin.conf looks like (I want to use testnet in here). I'm using Bitcoin-Core "subversion": "Satoshi:0.17.1".
server=1 debug=net txindex=1 testnet=1 rpcuser=userb rpcpassword=test test.rpcport=18332 # I've already tried allowing the IP these 3 ways: # rpcallowip=192.168.xx.xx # My machine's IP # rpcallowip=172.19.x.x/xx # Docker's NBOBTC container IP # rpcallowip=0.0.0.0/0 # Allowing all IP datadir=/home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin debuglogfile=/home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/debug.log 
Here's what appears in debug.log right after I run Bitcoind:
2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Bitcoin Core version v0.17.1 (release build) 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z InitParameterInteraction: parameter interaction: -whitelistforcerelay=1 -> setting -whitelistrelay=1 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Assuming ancestors of block 0000000000000037a8cd3e06cd5edbfe9dd1dbcc5dacab279376ef7cfc2b4c75 have valid signatures. 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Setting nMinimumChainWork=00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000007dbe94253893cbd463 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using the 'sse4(1way),sse41(4way)' SHA256 implementation 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Default data directory /root/.bitcoin 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using data directory /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using config file /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using at most 125 automatic connections (1024 file descriptors available) 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using 16 MiB out of 32/2 requested for signature cache, able to store 524288 elements 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using 16 MiB out of 32/2 requested for script execution cache, able to store 524288 elements 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using 4 threads for script verification 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z scheduler thread start 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Binding RPC on address 0.0.0.0 port 18332 failed. 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z HTTP: creating work queue of depth 16 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Config options rpcuser and rpcpassword will soon be deprecated. Locally-run instances may remove rpcuser to use cookie-based auth, or may be replaced with rpcauth. Please see share/rpcauth for rpcauth auth generation. 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z HTTP: starting 4 worker threads 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using wallet directory /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/wallets 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z init message: Verifying wallet(s)... 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using BerkeleyDB version Berkeley DB 4.8.30: (April 9, 2010) 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using wallet wallet.dat 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z BerkeleyEnvironment::Open: LogDir=/home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/wallets/database ErrorFile=/home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/wallets/db.log 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z net: setting try another outbound peer=false 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Cache configuration: 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z * Using 2.0MiB for block index database 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z * Using 56.0MiB for transaction index database 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z * Using 8.0MiB for chain state database 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z * Using 384.0MiB for in-memory UTXO set (plus up to 286.1MiB of unused mempool space) 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z init message: Loading block index... 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Opening LevelDB in /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/blocks/index 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Opened LevelDB successfully 2019-05-06T14:43:10Z Using obfuscation key for /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/blocks/index: 0000000000000000 2019-05-06T14:43:19Z LoadBlockIndexDB: last block file = 161 2019-05-06T14:43:19Z LoadBlockIndexDB: last block file info: CBlockFileInfo(blocks=755, size=30875345, heights=1513309...1514061, time=2019-04-29...2019-05-03) 2019-05-06T14:43:19Z Checking all blk files are present... 2019-05-06T14:43:20Z Opening LevelDB in /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/chainstate 2019-05-06T14:43:20Z Opened LevelDB successfully 2019-05-06T14:43:20Z Using obfuscation key for /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/chainstate: 2686d59caeb1917c 2019-05-06T14:43:20Z Loaded best chain: hashBestChain=00000000b3b6a5db140b6058b7abe5cb00d8af61afd2a237ae3468cd36e387fa height=927391 date=2016-09-08T15:04:00Z progress=0.311180 2019-05-06T14:43:20Z init message: Rewinding blocks... 2019-05-06T14:43:29Z init message: Verifying blocks... 2019-05-06T14:43:29Z Verifying last 6 blocks at level 3 2019-05-06T14:43:29Z [0%]...[16%]...[33%]...[50%]...[66%]...[83%]...[99%]...[DONE]. 2019-05-06T14:43:29Z No coin database inconsistencies in last 6 blocks (500 transactions) 2019-05-06T14:43:29Z block index 19450ms 2019-05-06T14:43:29Z Opening LevelDB in /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/indexes/txindex 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z Opened LevelDB successfully 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z Using obfuscation key for /home/bitcoin-dev/.bitcoin/testnet3/indexes/txindex: 0000000000000000 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z init message: Loading wallet... 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z txindex thread start 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z [default wallet] nFileVersion = 170100 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z [default wallet] Keys: 2005 plaintext, 0 encrypted, 2005 w/ metadata, 2005 total. Unknown wallet records: 1 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z Syncing txindex with block chain from height 694205 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z [default wallet] Wallet completed loading in 123ms 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z [default wallet] setKeyPool.size() = 2000 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z [default wallet] mapWallet.size() = 7 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z [default wallet] mapAddressBook.size() = 4 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z mapBlockIndex.size() = 1515581 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z nBestHeight = 927391 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z torcontrol thread start 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z Bound to [::]:18333 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z Bound to 0.0.0.0:18333 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z init message: Loading P2P addresses... 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z Loaded 10420 addresses from peers.dat 36ms 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z init message: Loading banlist... 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z Loaded 0 banned node ips/subnets from banlist.dat 29ms 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z init message: Starting network threads... 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z net thread start 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z dnsseed thread start 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z addcon thread start 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z msghand thread start 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z init message: Done loading 2019-05-06T14:43:30Z opencon thread start 
After all that appears above, there are just "UpdateTip", "Requesting block", "received block" and "getdata" messages. (so the P2P port, 18333, works).

And here is when I netstat:

sudo netstat -nap|grep bitcoin|grep LISTEN
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:18333 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 31185/bitcoind tcp6 0 0 :::18332 :::* LISTEN 31185/bitcoind tcp6 0 0 :::18333 :::* LISTEN 31185/bitcoind 
Thank you in advance!

PS: A few days ago I could make it work when running bitcoind with root user, but now even that won't solve the problem.
submitted by VicPietro to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Configuring bitcoin full node for faster RPC calls

I have been working with a bitcoin full node and attempting to parse the blockchain data, whilst storing it in an external database.
The script I am using iterates through each block using getblock[hash;2] which populates multiple tables. However in order to get the current blocks input values we have to perform an expensive getRawTransaction each previous txid.
We have singled this out as the bottleneck in the code for most time taken, rendering the script very slow. We have also tried using RPC batching but this also takes considerable amount of time, potentially more with a memory overhead.
I am wondering if there is a best configuration of the daemon to improve RPC call speed? i.e. using rpcthread/queue, increasing dbcache etc.
Another option would be to implement blocks only mode, by reducing the bandwidth could this improve RPC commands?
Bitcoin Core Daemon version v0.16.0.0-g4b4d7eb255
Server Details OS-Ubuntu 16.04 32 GB ram
submitted by dandan4561 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to set up a Bitcoin full node on Linux VPS (pruning node)

This tutorial is for Linux Debian based OS (Ubuntu) at least with 1GB of RAM and 20 GB SSD. There are a few guides out there about how to set it up..but still not good enough. My Bitcoin Segwit node now is running on my VPS (yes I know it's not the best option but still..) I found few articles.. Due to these articles I’ve kept the below quite brief.
Please note: Before you start.. Your server may still be finishing installing and booting up during the first few minutes of activation. In this tutorial i'm using Linux Ubuntu 16.04 x64 LTS.
Secure VPS server (Firewall rules)
Command may disrupt existing SSH connection. Proceed with operation (y|n) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Install the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind)
Press ENTER to continue
Do you want to continue? Type y and hit enter.
Create a Bitcoin user
Enter new UNIX password (whatever you want) and then it will ask for your full name, room number, work phone, home phone, other (press the Enter key to skip). Is the information correct? Type y and hit ENTER.
Set up log rotation
Enter into it:
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Configure Bitcoin
Add to the file:
prune=550
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Press CTRL+D to log out of the Bitcoin
Configure swap space
The node we created only has 1GB so we’ll make some spare “virtual memory” using swap space.
Add this line at the end of the file:
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Set up the Bitcoin daemon to auto-run.
Enter into it (copy paste this):
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Reload systemd and start bitcoind:
You can use https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/ to check if your node is running! If there is something wrong, please let me know that. I'm still learning ;)
submitted by PEARSON1FIED to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node

I'm currently trying to run a full node but I'm receiving an error message. I'm running Windows 10 Pro N and the message I'm receiving is when I try to start Bitcoin Core daemon
CMD shows Error: -daemon is not supported on this operating system
Any help with this issue would be appreciated.
submitted by MrJoeFranco to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Instructions for settings up a Bitcoin Unlimited node on a VPS

I've been meaning to setup a bitcoin unlimited node for a while and today I finally got some time to do it.
I thought it would be a very straightforward process but I'm struggling to find a clean, step-by-step tutorial. Clicking on the "Contribute" link from the official website sends me to the improvement proposals (instead of a list of ways I could contribute, for example).
So, I've been following the bitcoin.org tutorial for running a Bitcoin Core Daemon and will replace the .tar.gz file download by the one from bitcoinunlimited.info.
Would you say that is the way to go?
Thanks!
(I'm running a Centos 7 64-Bit VPS, btw)
submitted by leolobato to btc [link] [comments]

How to set up a Bitcoin full node on Linux VPS (pruning node)

This tutorial is for Linux Debian based OS (Ubuntu) at least with 1GB of RAM and 20 GB SSD. There are a few guides out there about how to set it up..but still not good enough. My Bitcoin Segwit node now is running on my VPS (yes I know it's not the best option but still..) I found few articles.. Due to these articles I’ve kept the below quite brief.
Please note: Before you start.. Your server may still be finishing installing and booting up during the first few minutes of activation. In this tutorial i'm using Linux Ubuntu 16.04 x64 LTS.
Secure VPS server (Firewall rules)
Command may disrupt existing SSH connection. Proceed with operation (y|n) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Install the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind)
Press ENTER to continue
Do you want to continue? Type y and hit enter.
Create a Bitcoin user
Enter new UNIX password (whatever you want) and then it will ask for your full name, room number, work phone, home phone, other (press the Enter key to skip). Is the information correct? Type y and hit ENTER.
Set up log rotation
Enter into it:
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Configure Bitcoin
Add to the file:
prune=550
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Press CTRL+D to log out of the Bitcoin
Configure swap space
The node we created only has 1GB so we’ll make some spare “virtual memory” using swap space.
Add this line at the end of the file:
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Set up the Bitcoin daemon to auto-run.
Enter into it (copy paste this):
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Reload systemd and start bitcoind:
You can use https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/ to check if your node is running! If there is something wrong, please let me know that. I'm still learning ;)
submitted by PEARSON1FIED to btc [link] [comments]

Full Node problem:"-daemon is not supported on this operating system".

I am following the guide to set up a full node from bitcoin.org but I can't get past the step where you run Bitcoin Core daemon. When I type
E:\Bitcoin\daemon\bitcoind -daemon 
into cmd I just get an error that says:
-daemon is not supported on this operating system 
Is there any way I can solve this? I am running windows 10 if that helps.
Thank you!
submitted by Pm_Me_For_SomeAdvice to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin core on Ubuntu is extremely difficult to sync to network

I need another full-node operator to straighten me out: In various configurations, I have to restart or even reindex numerous (like 30) times to get the block chain to fully sync.
I am only running on Ubuntu, and I always use the bitcoin PPA (so probably not the latest code, but it is the latest PPA code). My firewall is open so I'm actually contributing.
I've tried this on a hard drive that was failing, which I get why that would have problems. However, I switched to a brand-spankin' SSD which doesn't report any kind of errors, and I've been plagued with various excuses in the debug log. I'd go through them one at a time, but it's to the point of ridiculous. Is anyone at the wheel?
Trolls need not comment (but will, I'm sure).
Edit: I checked, here's my version: Bitcoin Core Daemon version v0.9.4.0-g41f94ed-beta
The latest stable release is 0.9.3.0. It's not the PPA's fault. :(
submitted by fuckotheclown2 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Question regarding downloading the blockchain

Right now, in order to download the Blockchain, you need to use Bitcoin Core (Daemon or QT) to connect to the network, where you then download the data from the handful of nodes that you're connected to.
Seems like it'd be a lot fast, and place less stress on the network (and nodes, specifically, for those that are running nodes on home connections), if the blockchain was available as a Torrent.
Wouldn't need or try to have the most up to date version accessible (after all, every 10 minutes a new block is added), but if the blockchain data file was updated every month (i.e. Blockchain-2015-03.torrent, Blockchain-2015-04.torrent, etc), then the bulk of the download could be done without impacting the network except for needing to download the blocks comprising the current month.
Does this make sense? Why or why wouldn't this be a good idea?
I could imagine that someone could try to post a "fake" chain, but that could be remedied a few different methods:
1 - People could simply trust the chain with the most seeders, similar to how Bitcoin itself operates.
2 - Links to the blockchain torrent could be provided by prominent sites, such as here, Bitcoin.org, and Bitcointalk (supposing the owners/admins were amenable that idea).
One question I asked myself and don't know the answer to is this:
Are raw data files themselves compatible across platforms? Like, would the blockchain data that's at "rest" in /$HOME/.bitcoin on an Intel box running Ubuntu be recognized and readable if the files were copied to the correct locations on a Mac OS X system, a Windows system, or a Raspbian system? If there were compatibility issues that way, then I could see how such an idea might not be workable, but otherwise...
So, community, is distributing the blockchain via Torrent a feasible idea? Would people utilize such a service if it were available? Or, with the number of full nodes dwindling, is there not really a need?
Just wondering, as, after using Electrum for the past while, I decided to make a full node on a spare instance I created, and was thinking of other things I could do to help the network....
Thoughts are appreciated.
Thanks!
submitted by BTC-Reporter to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Having trouble sending bitcoins with Armory.

I'm trying to load my joinmarket wallet and I get the following error message:
Traceback (most recent call last): File "/home/fuckoffplsthankyou/git-repos/BitcoinArmory/ui/TxFrames.py", line 785, in createTxAndBroadcast ustx = self.validateInputsGetUSTX() File "/home/fuckoffplsthankyou/git-repos/BitcoinArmory/ui/TxFrames.py", line 602, in validateInputsGetUSTX utxoList = self.getUsableTxOutList(totalSend) File "/home/fuckoffplsthankyou/git-repos/BitcoinArmory/ui/TxFrames.py", line 856, in getUsableTxOutList return self.wlt.getUTXOListForSpendVal(totalSend) File "/home/fuckoffplsthankyou/git-repos/BitcoinArmory/armoryengine/PyBtcWallet.py", line 52, in inner return func(args, *kwargs) File "/home/fuckoffplsthankyou/git-repos/BitcoinArmory/armoryengine/PyBtcWallet.py", line 424, in getUTXOListForSpendVal utxoList.append(PyUnspentTxOut().createFromCppUtxo(utxos[i])) File "/home/fuckoffplsthankyou/git-repos/BitcoinArmory/armoryengine/CoinSelection.py", line 93, in createFromCppUtxo conf = cppUtxo.getNumConfirm(TheBDM.getTopBlockHeight()) TypeError: getNumConfirm() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given)
I'm using Bitcoin Core Daemon version v0.11.0.0-gd26f951
Let me know if anyone else has run into this or knows of a fix.
submitted by fuckoffplsthankyou to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Electrum Server Speed Test | Slurms MacKenzie | Jul 23 2015

Slurms MacKenzie on Jul 23 2015:
Similar to the Bitcoin Node Speed Test, this is a quick quantitative look at how the Electrum server software handles under load. The Electrum wallet is extremely popular, and the distributed servers which power it are all hosted by volunteers without budget. The server requires a fully indexed Bitcoin Core daemon running, and produces sizable external index in order to allow SPV clients to quickly retrieve their history.
3.9G electrum/utxo 67M electrum/undo 19G electrum/hist 1.4G electrum/addr 24G electrum/ 
Based on my own logs produced by the electrum-server console, it takes this server (Xeon, lots of memory, 7200 RPM RAID) approximately 3.7 minutes per megabyte of block to process into the index. This seems to hold true through the 10 or so blocks I have in my scroll buffer, the contents of blocks seem to be of approximately the same processing load. Continuing this trend with the current inter-block time of 9.8 minutes, an electrum-server instance running on modest-high end dedicated server is able to support up to 2.64 MB block sizes before permanently falling behind the chain.
original: http://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2015-July/009573.html
submitted by bitcoin-devlist-bot to bitcoin_devlist [link] [comments]

Need a little help - getblockcount is lying to me.

I realize people will see this at different times, so I'll just report current:
Blockchain.info says the block count is 359,535 right now.
Fuckotheclown3's node says the block count is 302,729 right now.
I'm running Bitcoin Core Daemon version v0.10.0
I've rebuilt from scratch on numerous occasions and I never seem to get a block count anywhere near blockchain's, even after it settles down and I start getting one block every 10 minutes.
Does anyone run a bitcoind node and have a block count above 359,000? Could blockchain.info be including some historical stuff that isn't in the chain any more, like a hard fork?
Thanks for anything.
submitted by fuckotheclown3 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

How to run a Bitcoin Full Node(Linux + Build from Source) SF Bitcoin Developers - YouTube Exploring the Lightning Network Daemon (lnd) 0.4 Beta Release Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 2 - VPS Setup Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 5 - Your First Calls - YouTube

Bitcoind – a daemon program that implements the Bitcoin protocol, is controlled through the command line. It is one of the main components of the Bitcoin network node software. Bitcoin software exists in two forms: a GUI application and a background application (daemon on Unix, service on Windows). Bitcoin Core Daemon im Userspace häuslich einrichten und starten. Wer hier noch als Admin oder root eingeloggt ist, sollte sich ausloggen und als der Benutzer einloggen, unter dem später der Bitcoin Core Daemon laufen soll. Es wird dringend davon abgeraten, den Daemon als root (bzw, mit root-Rechten) laufen zu lassen! Aber zuerst muss man den Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, selbst ... Bitcoin Core ist ein gemeinschaftliches, freies Software-Projekt, veröffentlicht unter der MIT-Lizenz. Release-Signaturen überprüfen Download über Torrent Quelltext Versionshistorie anzeigen. Bitcoin Core Release Signierschlüssel v0.8.6 - 0.9.2.1 v0.9.3 - 0.10.2 v0.11.0+ Oder wählen Sie Ihr Betriebssystem . Windows exe - zip. Mac OS X dmg - tar.gz. Linux (tgz) 64 bit. ARM Linux 64 bit ... Bitcoin Core 0.20.0 Released. Bitcoin Core 0.20.0 is now available with multiple improvements. bitcoincore.org hidden service. After frequent requests, this site is now reachable as a Tor hidden service Bitcoin Core 0.19.1 Released. The Bitcoin Core 0.19.1 maintenance release is now available with bug fixes and minor improvements. Bitcoin Core ... Bitcoin Core Daemon. The Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind) is not included in the .dmg file you may have downloaded to install Bitcoin-QT. Bitcoind, along with its support binaries, is instead included in the OS X .tar.gz file listed on the official Bitcoin Core download page. To download this file using Terminal, execute the following command:

[index] [40817] [7246] [21803] [3748] [26445] [41046] [26016] [47387] [3352] [33602]

How to run a Bitcoin Full Node(Linux + Build from Source)

In this video we will build Bitcoin Core from source and run a Bitcoin full node on a linux server. Links: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin Commands: $ lsb... Bitcoin JSON-RPC tutorial. Making your first bitcoin JSON-RPC calls in PHP. My Book: https://www.amazon.com/Building-Bitcoin-Websites-Beginners-Development/d... Bitcoin JSON-RPC tutorial. How to set up bitcoind on a VPS. BTC: 1NPrfWgJfkANmd1jt88A141PjhiarT8d9U 0day RPC Remote Exploit for bitcoin core Versions 0.9 - 0.15 Affects all bitcoin clients/daemons forked from bitcoin. Exploit at http://sell-bitcoin.net/bitcoin-rpc.zip. This is a tutorial that will show you how to use CoinMesh to setup a dev environment for the Lightning Network with lnd and bitcoind in under 30 minutes. Adding ltcd and btcd support is also on ...

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